Posts Tagged ‘book marketing’

Things an Indie Author Should Share

February 12, 2018

Last weekend, my wife and I were wandering around our local Costco. We had a list for that shopping trip, but we got sidetracked by one of the giveaway stations offering free pastry samples.

We went past, tried one, and were very pleased with the tasty little chunks of poppy seed roll. We found an excuse to wander past again, and help ourselves to another sample (at least, I did).

“Didn’t your grandmother make these?” I asked. My wife nodded, and took the second sample away from me.

“Yes, and these are almost as good,” she said, smiling as she ate it herself. Too embarrassed to go back a third time for a freebie, I caved-in and bought a whole roll.

Be Personal
Believe it or not, a good use of social media for the indie-author works in a similar way. The writer gives a small, free sample of their life or, as with this blog, shares some of the things they’ve discovered about the world of independent publishing.

Writing about your discoveries, as well as your likes and dislikes, gives readers an opportunity to meet you, to know a bit of what’s going on in your life, and connect in a friendly way.

Think of your social media posts like the little free chunks of pastry at the Costco giveaway station. The samples you give away help readers become invested in your whole story.

You want them to feel like they know you, after all … and the reason should be obvious. The hope of every indie-author in doing this is always the same … to entice followers into buying a book.

I confess … I’m guilty.

Ratings & Reviews
However, sometimes authors struggle to find the right voice with their social media. If you choose to write a blog, starting one is easy. But please realize I’m not talking about giving away personal secrets, or anything else you feel uncomfortable sharing.

It’s up to you to draw the line at what you feel is appropriate, but your social media will always benefit greatly from posts that talk about your writing process, books that truly inspire you, how you go about crafting your stories, or what you do when you get stuck.

I’ve done that often, and find fellow storytellers relish the chance to read personal thoughts on the creative process.

Since your main goal is to get more readers interested in following you as a person it’s okay to show off a bit. Opening up about your experiences is a great way to help to grow your readership.

Don’t forget to also offer readers a chance to comment on what you say … and be sure to respond to those comments. What readers say is important, because ratings, reviews and comments are things people will look at before deciding to buy.

Don’t Forget the Links
If you’re an indie-author, I’m sure you already know there’s no room full of marketers helping you figure out how to sell what you write. For a newbie, that fact alone can be discouraging.

Once you start on this road, you will soon discover that it’s a whole lot of work trying to promote yourself … far more work than you might have imagined.

But I guarantee it’s worth it.

At the end of the day, staying trustworthy to your customer base is simply about being honest, consistent and, most of all, sharing the love of what you do.

As a final point, be certain to remember the real purpose of an indie-author blog, as I said earlier, is to convince people to buy your books, so make sure readers know where to go if they want one.

Don’t overdo it, of course, but be sure to mention your books, and make sure it’s easy for readers to find where to buy them.

Write regularly, without spamming people, and you’ll also discover folks interested in what you say are coming back often to visit their new-found friend … and the more times they visit, the more likely they are to cave in and buy that whole poppy seed roll.

Just be sure to give them value for their time.

**********

My books have all garnered some terrific reviews, and you can see the ones I have available by using the Amazon link below. Look for them. Better yet, buy one and read it. You just might like it.

buy now;

**********

You’re invited to visit my website, BROKEN GLASS to hear the remarkable radio interview about my novel “Blood Lake” on The Authors Show, or like my Book of Face page.

You can also find me on Goodreads, or follow some of my shorter ramblings on The Twitter.

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Comments posted below will be read, greatly appreciated and perhaps even answered.

How Easy is it to Become an Author?

January 15, 2018

You have stories to tell and fantastic ideas floating around in your imagination that deserve to be communicated to a vast army of readers. Hell, you can imagine and create stories that are as good as any of them out there, can’t you?

How Hard Can It Be?
Who wouldn’t be excited? You know in your heart you can be the next Hemingway, Faulkner or Rowling and your talent deserves the celebrity and prestige of authordom … and a shot at immortality.

Why? Because you’ve been validated by your friends.

Now, all you have to do is follow a formula to find a good agent to get your work published. If you don’t know one, you can sign on to the abundance of places on the internet claiming to locate them.

Easy, right?

Maybe you’ve already tried the traditional route. You’ve submitted your ideas to agents, or maybe you actually found a publisher, but your work didn’t sell very well. You’re certain the only problem was no one was promoting it properly.

What do you do now?

Self Publish?
Perhaps you’re thinking about doing it yourself and going indie. People have told you the traditional publishing business is faltering anyhow. Retailers like Waldenbooks and Borders are already out of business. From what you hear, Barnes & Noble is in danger, too.

Every day, advice for the self-published author is coming at you from people who tout their expertise. Many claim to offer you a magic ladder that will get you into the stratosphere. All I can say, if you decide to do it yourself, be careful who you use to assist you.

You’ll find services that say they were created expressly to get you discovered, increase your book sales, get your work on television, into the movies, or adapted for the stage.

Their come-ons are great. If you’ve dreamed that far, it’s easy to imagine lots of money rolling in, being lionized at book parties and having people line up for your autograph.

Why not?

Just remember, nearly everyone who tells you this comes at a price, and most guarantee nothing at all. All I can do is say good luck … and remind you: A fool and his money are soon parted.

Writers’ Conferences
You could decide to attend a good writers’ conference, which I actually do recommend – (see Rochester Writers).

Many occasionally offer speakers who can tell you how to find a good agent and make it in the business (but remember, many don’t tell you how they made it … because many of them didn’t).

You have to choose wisely.

CreateSpace
You decide to take the plunge and use CreateSpace to get your work listed on Amazon (it’s what I’d recommend, if you asked me).

Amazon welcomes you into their book-selling machine and, for all intents and purposes, you are finally what you always dreamed you’d be … a published author. Your friends and family are proud of you. Amazon has come to your rescue.

Except …

Okay, so you probably don’t get to quit your day job.

For some, that really doesn’t matter. Just being published is worth the journey. You are officially an author, sainted by experience, up there with Dickens, Tolstoy, Hemingway, Asimov, et al.

But readers aren’t stampeding to the cash register to buy your book, and those dismal sales are discouraging. So now what?

You try lowering the price to $9.99; then $5.99; then $2.99; then to .99 cents. Finally, you offer it for free (imagine the irony of becoming a best seller for a book that’s free). Nothing happens.

You can’t blame Amazon. You’re in a very crowded pond, in the company of a multitude of authors and literally thousands of books. How can readers find you? Oh, they might take a chance for free, or pack you into their Kindle to read some day.

Maybe.

Hard, Time-Consuming Work
This is when the “How-to-Succeed” boys will come after you again, trying to drag you into their podcasts and how-to subscriptions (always for a price), to show you how to stand-out from the mix.

They’ll dangle in front of you the possibility of speaking gigs, publicity and discoverability. Then (again for a price), they will tell you to get off your butt and blog like all-get-out, social network like crazy, create a massive circle of “friends” and cultivate those new “friends” like hell.

They’ll admonish you to personalize yourself. Tell folks your life story. Bond with them. Keep them engaged. After all, maybe some of them are actually readers. Finally, they’ll try to get you to push these new “friends” to buy your books and, above all, leave a review.

Promote Yourself
You might think that I’m putting you on, satirizing the indie author’s dilemma, but I’m not. I’ve been at this for many years, analyzing the process, studying it, experimenting.

Call this little exercise a cautionary tale. Better yet, a reality check.

Because there is no magic bullet.

You don’t realize it yet, but I just saved you a ton of money. I told you essentially what you’ll discover in all those “How-to-Succeed” sites.

You can promote yourself.

Just don’t go around screaming “Buy my book!” That will only succeed in turning people off entirely.

Getting your name burned into the public consciousness without a huge cash expenditure is a task requiring all your ingenuity and time. The net is like a bullet train, passing at warp speed. Getting the public’s attention is paramount. Keeping it is a small miracle.

Go For It
Don’t get me wrong. I don’t want to dampen your enthusiasm for becoming an author, because with social networking skills, optimism and energy, you might develop a following. If you stay the course, the sales, recognition, celebrity and fame you crave could be yours.

In the end, however, remember it’s really all about your work. Is your dialogue believable? Are your characters and your stories worth the reader’s effort? Do they engage, connect and inspire? Make certain they do, and you might get lucky.

After all, someone does win the lottery.

**********

My books have all garnered some terrific reviews, and you can see the ones I have available by using the Amazon link below. Look for them. Better yet, buy one and read it. You just might like it.

buy now;

**********

I’ll be at the Rochester Writers’ Meeting this week. See you there!

**********

You’re invited to visit my website, BROKEN GLASS, or
like my Book of Face page. You can find me on Goodreads, or follow some of my shorter ramblings on The Twitter.

**********

Visit my web site to hear the remarkable radio interview about my novel “Blood Lake” by The Authors Show.

**********

Comments posted below will be read, greatly appreciated and perhaps even answered.

Books at Holiday Time

December 14, 2017


Photo Courtesy of Pixabay.

It’s that time of year again. In my neighborhood, holiday decorations are up, houses glow with lights, and the stores are crowded (which I take as a good sign). It’s also a time when we all think again about songs and stories based on the holidays.

Maybe it’s just the writer in me, but I also think about books.

One of my favorites is A Christmas Carol, by Charles Dickens. It’s undoubtedly one of the best-loved (and best-selling) tales in English literature. It’s been a holiday classic since its original publication almost exactly one-hundred-seventy-four years ago.

The story explored not only Scrooge’s redemptive journey, but the lives of the poor majority surrounding him. Inspired by his own rocky childhood, historians say Dickens was writing an indictment of 19th century industrial capitalism, and the disparity between the poor and the wealthy in early Victorian-era Britain.

He used the stingy-old-man character named Scrooge as a means of highlighting the need to return to traditional Christmas values, family togetherness and charity.

It’s a message we could all stand to hear again.

I was surprised to learn the classic only took Dickens six weeks to write. Published in London by Chapman and Hall on December 19, 1843, it was an immediate success with the public. The initial print run of 6,000 copies sold out by Christmas Eve.

However, for its author, it was a grave financial disappointment.

Dickens insisted on a lavish format for what was to become the most famous of his holiday books.

He wanted A Christmas Carol to be a beautiful little gift book, and as such he stipulated a fancy binding stamped with gold lettering on the spine and front cover; gilded edges on the paper all around; four full-page, hand-colored etchings and four woodcuts.

Examining preliminary copies, Dickens decided he disliked the color of the title pages, and found the end papers smudged when touched.

He called for immediate changes and by December 17, two days before the book’s official release, the publisher had produced new copies, coupled with a number of significant textual corrections, which pleased the young author.

Dickens, who was still optimistic about sales, set the price of the book reasonably to encourage the largest possible number of purchasers. He hoped more sales would bring in larger profits, relieving some of his financial obligations.

You see, in order to get the story published fast, Dickens had agreed to an unprecedented publishing arrangement: he would assume all of the costs of the initial publication but, in doing so, would also gain all of the profits.

Dickens was initially elated with the public’s overwhelming response. But the cost of producing the book was so high that once expenses were tabulated, there was very little left over for the author himself.

When Dickens received the production receipts from Chapman and Hall, he found after the deductions for printing, paper, drawing, steel plates, engraving, coloring, binding, advertising and a commission to the publishers, the balance to his credit was only one-tenth of what he imagined, and far too little to live on.

“The truth,” wrote Dickens friend and literary adviser, John Forster, “was that the price charged was far too little.”

It’s interesting to note, despite the profitability shortfall, by February of 1844, less than two months after the book’s appearance, at least eight theatrical versions of A Christmas Carol were already in production. Since then, there have been literally hundreds more adaptations for stage, radio, television, and film.

The public loved it. The tale of one man’s redemption interwoven with Victorian Christmas traditions morphed into every publisher’s dream. The book has never been “out of print.”

I find it to be no small irony that for this instantly classic Christmas tale of greed and beneficence, Dickens received none of the millions Tiny Tim and Ebenezer Scrooge continue to generate every year.

**********

My books have all garnered some terrific reviews, and you can see the ones I have available by using the Amazon link below. Look for them. Better yet, buy one and read it. You just might like it.

buy now;

**********

You’re invited to visit my website, BROKEN GLASS, or
like my Book of Face page. You can find me on Goodreads, or follow some of my shorter ramblings on The Twitter.

**********

Visit my web site to hear the remarkable radio interview about my novel “Blood Lake” by The Authors Show.

**********

Comments posted below will be read, greatly appreciated and perhaps even answered.


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