Posts Tagged ‘using social media’

Things That Shouldn’t Surprise You Much About Self-Publishing

March 3, 2020


Starting off in self-publishing can seem like a perilous journey. I know it did for me.

Getting into a new venture is always both exciting and scary, at the same time. Exciting to be doing something new, but scary because you don’t necessarily know what to do first…or even how to sound like you know what you’re doing.

Sometimes it’s good to just kick back, push off any deadlines (real or imagined), turn off the phone, and daydream a little.

After all, if you’re self-employed author, doesn’t that mean you get to goof off once in a while? That you’re the boss, not that pesky little nagging voice in your head?

Like I said…scary. But you pick it up soon enough.

As you move forward you have to keep your bearings. That means you remember what your destination was when you set out from shore, and you keep aiming for that destination until you get there.

Self-Publishing is Not a Get-Rich-Quick Scheme
Believe me, I know. I’ve had several Readers’ Favorite medal winners, so I think I’ve been doing reasonably well. But I’m sure you’ve heard me say I only make enough to take my beautiful bride out to dinner once in a while. I keep writing because I feel I have things to say.

So, it’s a good thing I retired from a good nine-to-five that put bread on the table.

Yet, new self-publishers have that gleam in the eye. They’ve read the success stories. It obviously happened to others. Why not them?

But I’m willing to bet you didn’t start writing to make a killing on the internet. You had something else in mind. Maybe just to have a memento to share, or a family keepsake. Perhaps it was as simple as my plan. Something to do.

Remembering that, it has actually guided me well.

I’ve always been impressed by the collegiality of publishing. Maybe it’s because few books compete directly with each other, but people in publishing…particularly authors in indie publishing…are extraordinarily helpful to newcomers. And a bonus: they’re pretty literate, too!

I mean, just wander around Amazon for a while and take in the richness of interests displayed there. Whatever you’re interested in writing, there are undoubtedly people interested in reading it. You just have to find them.

That’s where things like this blog, a Twitter presence, a Book of Face page, or other social media sites are so important. You will discover the need for a platform. Fortunately, one of the great things about social media is that it’s so social.

The single most important thing is to “Be the Market”

Take the time for book-signings, and promote them yourself, if no one else will. If you are part of the market that’s interested in the subject you’ve written about, particularly in fiction, you’re at an advantage. You know what those people like. The fact you’ve surmounted that reader hurdle, and are able to talk about it or, better yet, write about it, all adds up to a book with value.

None of these things may surprise you, but they bear repeating, and remembering, too. The availability and diversity of self-publishing makes it one of the greatest opportunities of the new media age.

Well, there you have it. Now get busy and write.

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The reading and book-signing scheduled for 7:00pm on March 16, at the Detroit Working Writers Springing to Mind Fantasy Event at the Royal Oak Library has been cancelled due to coronavirus fears.

The book-signing from 11:00am-5:00pm at the Leon & Lulu Books and Authors Event in Clawson on March 22, 2020 is still up in the air, for the same reason. Please check their website for updates.

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Gentle Readers, my books have all garnered some terrific reviews. You can see all of them by using the Amazon link below. Check them out. Better yet, buy one and read it. You just might like it.

buy now;

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You’re invited to visit my author’s website, BROKEN GLASS to hear the remarkable radio interview about my novel “Blood Lake” on The Authors Show, or see my three local television interviews. You can also like my Book of Face page, find me on Goodreads, or follow my shorter ramblings on The Twitter.

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Comments posted below will be read, greatly appreciated and perhaps even answered.

Making the Most of a Writing Conference

October 8, 2018

Oakland University, Rochester, Michigan

Let’s face it. Writing can be a solitary endeavor, but you don’t have go it alone. You can always do what I do … attend a writing conference, and meet some of the other members of that tribe called writers.

On October 20, I plan to attend the Rochester Writers’ Conference at Oakland University again, something I’ve done every fall for the eleven years it’s been in existence.

It’s a great conference. You’ll find loads of interesting workshops, access to agents and editors … and swarms of writers of various levels, all packaged neatly into a nice, affordable, single-day event.

Workshops
Conferences like this are a great way to learn about all aspects of writing. You can attend a variety of workshops, gathering methods to turn your ideas into finished stories. You’ll also learn more about trends in the industry and the business side of writing.

Plus, you’ll have the opportunity to gather advice on using social media tools like Twitter, and delve into making personal podcasts to develop your writing career and market your stories to readers.

I decided long ago to go the indie route with my fiction, but if you’re still thinking about traditional publishing, or have an interest in the non-fiction market, the Rochester Writers’ Conference will offer an opportunity to pitch to agents, and talk to a panel of editors.

That experience, in itself, is fabulous. If nothing else, talking directly to agents and editors let’s you examine your own work through a professional’s objective eye.

You might even get comfortable talking about your work – something you’ll definitely need to do when trying to sell someone on your proposals, or when marketing your books.

Networking
Even if the conference itself doesn’t offer all the answers, you often need to look no further than those around you. Looking for a good editor? Thinking about arranging speaking engagements? Trying to find a cover or website designer?

Talking to, and connecting with, other writers can be one of the most valuable things about attending a writing conference.

Talk, be friendly, ask questions. You’re with your tribe, after all.

Make the Most of It
Here are some suggestions to ensure a productive experience. First, take a few minutes to plan for the workshops you want.

A word of warning … you probably won’t get to all of them, due to time constraints.

So, pick wisely among the sessions you know will give you the most help. But go beyond that. Challenge yourself and take at least one session on a topic outside your comfort zone. You’ll be glad you did.

If you’re a beginning author, with more questions than answers, don’t fret. Most of the sessions are geared to accommodate you. Plus, you’ll find many experienced authors in attendance will be happy to share what they’ve already learned.

Remember – Elevator Pitch
If you plan to pitch your work to an agent, don’t worry if you’re nervous. Everybody is. Compensate by being over-prepared. Have at least a rough draft ready before you go.

Also, keep it short.

You usually only have sessions of about 15 minutes with an agent so, please, don’t fill your time with nervous apologies, or rambling, inconsequential details of your personal life.

Talk about your book. Give them your elevator pitch.

Tell what your character wants, why he wants it, and what keeps him from getting it. You should be able to tell your whole story-line in 30 seconds. Remind yourself it’s okay not to explain all the details or the final outcome. Stop at a moment of tension and wait.

Let the agent guide the discussion. Find out what’s caught their attention, or what piece is missing. The longer you talk, the less time the agent or editor is talking, and the main reason you’re talking to them is to hear their feedback and reaction.

Not planning to pitch? Still be prepared to talk about your writing. Other attendees will want to know about your work, and your elevator pitch should always be ready to go.

Be Professional
Have a business card. A business card, with your contact information, is an easy, professional leave behind to give to agents, editors and other writers. I actually prefer a bookmark, because I can list my books, too. Besides, I’ve learned they’re harder to lose.

When you attend any conference, you’ll be making a lot of first impressions. Not only with professionals in your industry, but a host of your peers. It’s okay to show your personality a little, because that can reflect your writing style.

Just make sure people think it’s a good one.

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My novel “Blood Lake” was a Readers’ Favorite Bronze Medal Winner and a ForeWord Indie Finalist. It was just named a 2018 book-of-the-year finalist by TopShelf Magazine.

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I’ll be signing books at Lake Orion High School on Saturday, October 13, and again at the Books & Authors Event at Leon & Lulu in Clawson on Sunday, October 28.

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Gentle Readers, my books have all garnered some terrific reviews. You can see all of them by using the Amazon link below. Check them out. Better yet, buy one and read it. You just might like it.

buy now;

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You’re invited to visit my author’s website, BROKEN GLASS to hear the remarkable radio interview about my novel “Blood Lake” on The Authors Show. You can also like my Book of Face page, find me on Goodreads, or follow my shorter ramblings on The Twitter.

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Comments posted below will be read, greatly appreciated and perhaps even answered.

What Do You Include in Your Book Marketing?

July 3, 2018

Annoying animation courtesy giphy.com

I know I’ve asked you this before. You’re an indie author who’s written a book. Now what?

Most indie authors think writing the book is the hard part … until they discover they also have to take on the job of marketing it.

Oops.

That’s usually when I hear: Where do I begin?

Advanced Review Copies (ARCs)
Advanced Review Copies, or ARCs for short, are bound and/or electronic copies of your completed book. You send them to book reviewers you’d like to have endorse it.

They supposedly help build buzz for your upcoming release and help you gain interesting blurbs to put on the cover.

With seven published books you’d think I would have already tried Advanced Review Copies. However, they are one of the few things with which I haven’t yet experimented.

I intend to start with my next book and, since I currently have three new novels (yes, three) in various stages of preparation, I should get to test the concept fairly soon.

What to Include on Your ARC
On the front cover add the words: “Advance Uncorrected Proof / Not for Sale.” On the back cover, put a brief book description (100-150 words) and author bio. At least half of the back cover should have information on the book’s promotion plan, including:

  • Marketing Campaign: In a bulleted list, detail how the book will be marketed and promoted, both to the industry and to readers.
  • Publication Information: List all the details related to publication, including formats and price points, ISBN numbers and category.
  • Publicity Contact: The email for whoever is the primary contact for media should be listed.
  • Ordering Information: Make it clear where and how the book will be available for sale.
  • Website: Don’t forget to include your author website.

It should go without saying that every author needs a website, even if it is a single page with links to other social media. It is the go-to online space for readers to find out more about you and your work.

Your author website should be the base that links all your other social media accounts, news about your book, tour schedule if relevant, and links to book reviews.

Blog
Don’t just have one; add to it consistently. Adding a blog like this one that talks about your writing, or publishing in general, keeps your readers interested in you and your work.

Facebook, Twitter, Amazon Author Page, and Goodreads
Facebook, Twitter, an Amazon Author Page, and Goodreads are social media outlets where, as an author, you should have a presence. You might even want to upload book trailers to YouTube. The more hits and likes you garner, the more your book will get noticed.

You may be surprised to know you’ll need to build this platform with traditional publishers, too.

Book Publicity
Book publicity can make a big difference. TV, radio, and good-old-fashioned print reviews and interviews are invaluable components of a successful book marketing strategy.

If you have the budget, hire a professional.

If, like me, your budget is small or nonexistent, you can try to develop press releases on your own. Whether you take this step or not, you should also plan to have author events such as signings and/or talks at bookstores, other retailers, book clubs, writing groups, and events hosted by professional organizations.

Take the First Step
The most important thing about a book marketing strategy is to have one. It might seem overwhelming in the beginning, but taking the first step is the hardest part.

Don’t worry about making mistakes. Everyone does. It’s how we learn. What matters most is that you try. If you don’t, people won’t discover, buy or read your book.

So, go on … give your book a chance.

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As busy as I make myself sound, I took time out the other day to celebrate a milestone with my lovely bride…our 48th Wedding Anniversary. She’s the best thing to ever happen to me.

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Gentle Readers, my books have all garnered some terrific reviews. You can see all of them by using the Amazon link below. Check them out. Better yet, buy one and read it. You just might like it.

buy now;

**********

You’re invited to visit my author’s website, BROKEN GLASS to hear the remarkable radio interview about my novel “Blood Lake” on The Authors Show. You can also like my Book of Face page, find me on Goodreads, or follow my shorter ramblings on The Twitter.

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On March 1, 2018, Rochester Media started publishing my articles about writing. The column will update about every three weeks. Take a look, leave a comment and let me know what you think.

On Sunday, July 15, 2018 I am privileged to join other local area writers at the Rochester Writers’ Table at the Detroit Bookfest at Eastern Market in Detroit.

On Tuesday, July 17, 2018 I will be at the Freelance Marketplace Writers’ Group meeting at Barnes & Noble in Rochester Hills.

On Saturday, July 28, 2018 I plan to participate in a book-signing during Sterlingfest, in Sterling Heights, Michigan.

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Comments posted below will be read, greatly appreciated and perhaps even answered.


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