Posts Tagged ‘new author’

Author Interview

April 1, 2018

Michigan Author, Ryan Ennis

Today I’m not posting about my own books or the ins-and-outs of indie publishing. At the recommendation of a friend, I’m interviewing another Michigan author, Ryan Ennis.

Welcome to “Painting With Light,” Ryan.
Thank you. Glad to be here!

Can you tell us a little about yourself?
I’m a teacher, librarian, and writer who lives in Livonia, Michigan. I grew up in Canton Township. After graduating from Eastern Michigan, I went on to get two master’s degrees from Wayne State in Detroit.

My first two books were actually children’s book—THE THURSDAY SURPRISE and THE SEPTEMBER SURPRISE. Both are stories about kids and autism.

What led you to write children’s books about autism?
I’m a special education teacher who works with kids with autism. The idea for my first book came from the children. As a progressive educator, I saw the benefits of typical kids having interactions with the kids enrolled in the special education classrooms.

I’m impressed…but I understand it’s not all you like to write.
Besides writing children’s books, I love to write short stories. I’m the author of a recent short story collection called THE UNEXPECTED.

What would you like to tell us about your new book?
THE UNEXPECTED is a collection of nineteen tales with themes that have preoccupied me since I began writing stories in my teens: the nature of love; the consequences of acting on impulses; and the need or longing inside of us to be fulfilled.

Perhaps of interest to metro Detroit readers are the local suburban settings featured in my stories: Ferndale, Livonia, Royal Oak, Garden City, Hazel Park, etc. To appeal to a wide audience the collection strives for a balance with male and female main characters in overlapping settings and plots.

I enjoy exploring the psychology of my characters. Consequently, I spend time (in the form of detailed prose) getting into my characters’ heads, providing clear motivations for their actions, so that they are relatable and empathetic.

Yet, I also like to reserve a certain amount of mystery about them, so the final part of their tales brings about a denouement or resolution the reader never expected. Writing stories that leave a reader with a last impression has always been my goal.

That’s a wide range of subjects. It makes me wonder…what were you like at school?
Depending on the subject, I could be two different people. In certain math and science classes (neither of them my forte), I was the quiet one sitting off to the side or in the back.

But I was quite the opposite in English, foreign language, and social studies. In those classes, I’d sit front-and-center, always prepared with homework, and frequently volunteered to answer questions. I enjoyed having good relationships with my instructors.

I still have the awards I received from my ninth-grade English and German teachers in a file box. I also have a professor’s note, written on the back of an essay, encouraging me to apply for the Honor’s Program and become her research assistant.

Every so often, I’ll pull out old notes and messages and reread them. I’m sentimental that way. Thanks to Facebook, e-mails, and blogs, I’ve been able to stay in touch with some of my wonderful instructors from back in the day.

Readers often ask…where do your ideas come from?
My fiction comes mainly from two places: my heart and my eyes. When I say my heart, I mean my emotions and personal experiences that I feel need to be conveyed to the world with a voice other than my own—through my fictional characters.

As a writer, I’m also a keen observer of people—society. By analyzing and writing about the challenges and problems I see others facing, I find I’m a deeper thinker, a more compassionate and caring person, and hope my work inspires my readers to become the same.

What’s the hardest thing for you about writing?
The time factor is a major issue. When you’re a home and dog owner, teacher, and have a part-time job on the side, it can be difficult to find writing opportunities.

OK – so what’s the easiest thing?
I’ve always had a vivid imagination. When I walk my dog at night, I reflect a great deal on situations in my own life or in others, and envision a story unfolding from them. If only I had a transcriber who could read my thoughts and turn them into polished sentences and paragraphs…then the writing part would be a breeze.

Who (or what) inspires your writing?
Since all good stories must have conflicts, my writing stems from either personal challenges or the challenges of others I read about or experience in everyday life.

I also enjoy looking at portraits or scenes in a painting and creating a story about the people depicted in them, based on what I observe in their facial expressions. In my opinion, there’s nothing more exciting than dwelling in a world inspired by great art!

Do you work to an outline or prefer to just see where an idea takes you?
As a writer of mostly shorter works, I don’t find it necessary to write from an outline. Before I begin typing my story, I’ve already spent a considerable amount of time pondering how it all will play out.

When do you do most of your writing?
With my busy schedule, I try to set aside time in the evenings and on weekends to write, even if it means just enough to write a few paragraphs before bed. I try to keep myself in what I call “writing shape”—able to write productively.

Do you have any funny or peculiar writing habits?
I once read that Jackie Collins carried a notebook around with her everywhere and would write whenever she had moments free, even if it meant when she was stopped in her car waiting for the traffic light to change. I never attempted that one.

In my early twenties, I read several Victorian novels whose author introductions described how they would take their desks out onto their lawns in the summer, and produce flowery prose from sun-up until sundown. I tried it a few times, but I couldn’t concentrate outdoors—not sure why.

Oddly, I do my best writing sitting on my sofa with my laptop resting on a small stand in front of me. I usually have the TV or my stereo turned on low, though I don’t pay much attention to either. It seems I need some soft noise in the background to help me concentrate.

How have you evolved creatively since you started writing?
Over the years, my writing has naturally gotten better, the plot lines and character development of my stories more engaging. I enjoy getting into the mindset of my characters, the narrative of my stories driven by their thoughts, providing motivation for their actions.

I’ve never cared for stories in which the characters seemed vague or underdeveloped. I want my readers to be engrossed in the actions and the thoughts of my characters. I still have the first short story I ever wrote. I keep it around as a reminder of the importance of determination. My writing skills have come a long way since then.

For your own reading, do you prefer eBooks or traditional printed books?
I generally prefer reading printed books. Holding a book in my hand and turning the pages are experiences I still treasure. When it comes to newspaper and magazine articles, I’d rather read those online.

Who are your favorite authors?
My all-time favorite is Joyce Carol Oates. Her short stories are masterpieces. Even when one is only a few pages long, I feel as though I’ve inhabited a vast landscape after reading it. She manages to engage readers with her descriptions and her character’s emotional states. I also enjoy short stories by Truman Capote and Raymond Carver. Like them, I try to compose works that delve into the psychology of my characters.

Most writers I’ve met have a favorite quote. What’s yours?
My quote speaks to connection between reading and writing: “If you don’t have time to read, you don’t have the time (or the tools) to write. Simple as that.” ― Stephen King (editor’s note: Good choice!)

Reading everyday has so many benefits—improving your memory, increasing your vocabulary, and relieving stress. It can even help you to become a better writer. Most writers started out as voracious readers. I can say that my appetite for stories and books is what made me want to be a writer.

If there was something you could change about yourself, what would it be?
Watching how environmental problems have impacted our world, especially how they’ve destroyed crucial habitat for animals, I would like to get more involved in active conservation efforts. Endangered species are disappearing from our world at an alarming rate and may be gone completely in the not-too-distant future.

I would like to do something to stop that. After I retire from teaching, being an animal conservationist might be my next chapter—along with writing about this new adventure.

Reviews for “The Unexpected” have been very positive. How do you think you’d react to a negative review?
Always seeking to improve, I welcome constructive feedback.

What are your plans for future projects?
I’m currently in the initial phase of drafting a novel set in the ’80s. There’s many things about the ’80s—the music, the TV shows, the presence of bookstores everywhere—that I love.

Fascinating. Good luck with your writing, Ryan, and thank you for your time.

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You can find out more about Ryan at these links:

Twitter
Goodreads
LinkedIn
Pinterest

RYAN’S BOOK LINKS:
Amazon US
Amazon UK
Barnes & Noble
Smashwords

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Gentle Readers, my own books have garnered some terrific reviews, and you can see them by using the Amazon link below. Check them out. Better yet, buy one and read it. You just might like it.

buy now;

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You’re invited to visit my author’s website, BROKEN GLASS to hear the remarkable radio interview about my novel “Blood Lake” on The Authors Show. You can also like my Book of Face page, find me on Goodreads, or follow some of my shorter ramblings on The Twitter.

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On March 1, 2018, Rochester Media started publishing my articles about writing. The column will update twice a month. Come on over, take a look, leave a comment and let me know what you think.

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On Sunday, April 29, 2018, from 11:00am to 5:00pm, I will participate with a host of other local area writers in the Books & Authors book-signing event at the eclectic Leon & Lulu store on Fourteen Mile Road in Clawson, Michigan. Drop in and buy a book…there will be lots to choose from.

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Comments posted below will be read, greatly appreciated and perhaps even answered.

Next New Book

May 28, 2012

Newest TINKER Cover-RLHerron
© Front cover of my new book, “Tinker”

The first part of this year has been extremely busy. I sometimes think I’m working harder now than when I had a nine-to-five, and I have no one to blame but myself.

I just published my third book, a general fiction short-story collection entitled, “Tinker.”

As a teaser, here’s the first two paragraphs of the lead story:

I was eleven when my dog Tinker died. He hadn’t been sick or anything like that. Far from it. If he had been, I might have seen his passing as a blessing and an end to his torment. But he was only five years old, in the prime of his dog-years life. He’d been chasing a Frisbee, his tongue hanging out and his mouth open in a big, lolling doggie grin when he was hit by a car, right in front of my eyes.

In the days that followed, I was struck by the way grief, relief and guilt could co-exist in such a cozy fashion. I cried my eyes out as I carried his broken body back to the house. “Omigod, Dad, Tink’s hurt bad!”

The e-Book version is already available on Amazon and Barnes & Noble. The paperback will follow at both venues soon. You can already purchase the paperback on my secure “Books by Ronald Herron” site.

Now, like before, comes the hard part. Marketing. It’s something I’ve been thinking about lately … a lot. I spent my whole working career in public relations and marketing, and a lot of people think it might be something second nature to me by now.

It isn’t.

The more I think about it, the worse my headache becomes.

I’ve come to the conclusion, after reading the advice of all the online “professionals” out there, and seeing where publishing has been heading for the past several years, that I’d be much better off just asking you for feedback.

What have you liked about what I’ve written?

I know that’s a bit presumptuous, assuming you’ve purchased one of my books … but if you have done so – what did you like about it? Perhaps a better question might be, what didn’t you like?

I don’t seem to be getting much feedback here. Comments are posted infrequently.

Perhaps you have negative comments and don’t want to hurt my feelings. Trust me … you won’t. How will I ever improve, if you don’t tell me where I’m making mistakes? How can I make my writing better, if you don’t tell me about the parts you found difficult to follow? Or totally insipid?

The best possible marketing I could do is to find out what you think. I need you to tell your friends about my books. Let them give me some advice, too. Share this post with them.

I just started my fourth book, another novel, so I’ll have some time between brain spasms to actually respond to your comments. Whattaya say? Care to let me work a bit?

I promise to answer. In fact, I’m looking forward to it.

You can post comments here to start a discussion, or leave them on my work email: ron@ronaldherron.com.

 

First Reviews

May 23, 2012

Reichold Street cover
5-Star Review for “Reichold Street”

It’s always nice to find out someone likes your work.

I have a lot of family and friends who praise the things I do, and my novel “Reichold Street” has been no exception.

Still, there is always something inside you that, no matter how much people who know you say they like it, makes you hope someone you don’t know, someone who may never have heard of you before, will like it, too. A person who doesn’t feel obligated to say nice things.

Little things, like a reader commenting: “Oh, my goodness. This is a good book!”

Or online reviews that say things like: “masterfully written.”

And then there is that outside reviewer, that stranger you hoped for, who writes things like this:

  • “Reichold Street” is an extremely moving coming-of-age account during the turbulent 1960’s
  • This book will appeal to a vast audience
  • You will be moved by Albert’s shady beginnings to find out the real story behind all the madness
  • A great piece of literature…wonderful addition to any library

Then there’s my personal favorite:

  • Ronald L. Herron is a master of the art of character development

If this all sounds like a bit of bragging, you’re probably right. But the press releases don’t go out until next week. Until then, the book is still on sale on Amazon and Barnes & Noble Bookstore. Perhaps you should head on over and get your copy, before the crowds gather. LOL!

Seriously, it’s a lot of fun but, all things considered, it’s probably a good thing I’m retired and don’t have to worry about my day job. I don’t know how most writers survive.

Find out more about my books on the web site: Broken Glass


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